[US] Sailor Stars Viz English dub, DVD & Blu-ray thread

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sapphire91

Solaris Luna
Jul 6, 2018
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If it really sounds natural to natives, who am I to disagree. While I gravitated mostly to queen, I can see while they didn't use it. There has been way too many queens in this show.
 
Likes: ChibiBoi
Mar 8, 2012
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I'm a native speaker with a degree in English, and "Master Galaxia" does NOT sound natural at all.

Again, @ChibiBoi, it's permissible to say a woman is a master of or at something, but you would never address a woman with the title "Master." There's a difference.
 

sapphire91

Solaris Luna
Jul 6, 2018
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Haha, yall really hung up on this "Master" debate....

Any opinions on the actual dub itself?
Same as always. Servicable, nothing more than that. I willrank it higher than the previous seasons, because Shingo is not in it and so we never heard the very "fitting voice". And the rooftop scene was very weak.
 
Sep 13, 2009
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This doesn't really matter. It's a cartoon from 1996, not a live-action show from the 60s. Using contemporary words in a dub isn't a problem.
What does it matter if something set in a certain year is live action or animation? Anachronistic terminology is still anachronistic.
 

ChibiBoi

Aurorae Lunares
Jan 2, 2010
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I'm a native speaker with a degree in English, and "Master Galaxia" does NOT sound natural at all.

Again, @ChibiBoi, it's permissible to say a woman is a master of or at something, but you would never address a woman with the title "Master." There's a difference.
Then you’ll know that language is ever-evolving, with definitions constantly being updated, either falling in or out of fashion. Maybe you would never address a woman with the title “Master” in an academic setting, but it’s currently being used and accepted colloquially. Specifically in this case, “Master” is not used as an honorific such as “Mister” or “Ma’am,” but rather to show hierarchy and ownership. And apparently it’s been rid of its gender specification in the OED, so :whee:
Anyway, bringing it back to the Stars BD release, can’t wait to get my copy and complete the collection teehee =^_^=
 
Likes: SILVER
Nov 22, 2016
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What does it matter if something set in a certain year is live action or animation? Anachronistic terminology is still anachronistic.
I can say this as someone who worked both as a voice actor and as a script translator in Brazil. Using contemporary words in a Sailor Moon dub isn't really a problem. 1996 wasn't that far ago. But I'm not going in defense of "master" here. I'm not sure whether it sounds natural to a English native when applied to a woman.
 
Mar 8, 2012
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Then you’ll know that language is ever-evolving, with definitions constantly being updated, either falling in or out of fashion. Maybe you would never address a woman with the title “Master” in an academic setting, but it’s currently being used and accepted colloquially. Specifically in this case, “Master” is not used as an honorific such as “Mister” or “Ma’am,” but rather to show hierarchy and ownership. And apparently it’s been rid of its gender specification in the OED, so :whee:
I can't tell if you're being purposefully obtuse or not, and I apologize for prolonging this semi-off-topic tangent, but:

1. Yes, I know how language works.
2. This has nothing to do with academic settings.
3. Show me the receipts of people colloquially using, and people accepting the colloquial use of, "Master" as a title of address in reference to a woman.
4. Specifically in this case, "Master" IS BEING used as an honorific. Tin Nyanko says, "Master Galaxia." She does NOT say, "my master, Galaxia." There is an obvious difference.
5. The OED has not rid the title of its gender specification. The OED merely allows for the common noun "master" to refer to women in certain uses.

If some people are unbothered by "Master Galaxia," that's fine, but it's objectively a weird choice and I don't see the logic behind it. It feels like sloppy writing to me. Even if Viz intended to be gender neutral, it's illogical and arbitrary to assume "Master" functions better as a gender neutral term than "Mistress" or "Madame" would.

Anyway, peace out!
 

ChibiBoi

Aurorae Lunares
Jan 2, 2010
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I can't tell if you're being purposefully obtuse or not, and I apologize for prolonging this semi-off-topic tangent, but:

3. Show me the receipts of people colloquially using, and people accepting the colloquial use of, "Master" as a title of address in reference to a woman.
4. Specifically in this case, "Master" IS BEING used as an honorific. Tin Nyanko says, "Master Galaxia." She does NOT say, "my master, Galaxia." There is an obvious difference.
3. Here's what I found on the internet. Obviously I can't go around finding receipts from every recent conversation I've heard or go digging up movies or TV shows I've watched.



4. Master in this sense is more of a title than an honorific.

And I guess that's it on that. Welcome to 2019 :) xoxo Gossip Girl
 
Sep 13, 2009
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The title of "Jedi Master" in Star Wars has always been gender-neutral and does not equal the title of "Master" being used to refer to Galaxia in this dub.

Namely, Galaxia is not a Jedi.
 

ChibiBoi

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Jan 2, 2010
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The title of "Jedi Master" in Star Wars has always been gender-neutral and does not equal the title of "Master" being used to refer to Galaxia in this dub.

Namely, Galaxia is not a Jedi.
And here's another example, also not a Jedi:
:chibiusa:

And I'm going to stop right here before this topic gets WAY out of hand with so many excuses as to why a woman can't be referred to as "Master." It's 2019, guys. A Sailor Moon forum is not the place to show sexism LOL
 
Mar 8, 2012
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I mean... If we want to talk about sexism, let's talk about why anyone would default to using historically "masculine" language when trying to be "gender neutral." Let's talk about why anyone would use historically "masculine" language to refer to a woman under the guise of being "gender neutral." But sure, questioning the unusual, uncontextualized use of "Master Galaxia" is being sexist.

Anyway... Are there any other clips of Kakyu? She sounds typically bland in the brief clip shared earlier, but maybe she sounds better in a different scene? She's really the only new character (apart from Siren and Crow) in Sailor Stars I care about.
 
Likes: Starlight
Sep 13, 2009
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And here's another example, also not a Jedi:
:chibiusa:
Again, context is key. That's a "martial arts master". No one would say "martial arts mistress".

The "Master" title being used for Galaxia in this dub is the general, contextually-nonspecific version of the title that only denotes the basic concept of respected authority and leadership.
 
Sep 6, 2014
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Again, context is key. That's a "martial arts master". No one would say "martial arts mistress".

The "Master" title being used for Galaxia in this dub is the general, contextually-nonspecific version of the title that only denotes the basic concept of respected authority and leadership.
No its being used as her appellation not as her role.

Literally every example you’ve given has been in the context of a non-personable description of authority.

It would be correct if the Animates referred to Galaxia as their master. It’s not correct to refer to her as Master Galaxia.
 
Mar 8, 2012
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Did you mean to quote Sabrblade's comment Frenchfries?

Anyway, if the Animamates referred to Galaxia as their master, it would be whatever, but technically they should still use "mistress" because Galaxia is a woman. There's nothing about Galaxia's character, and certainly nothing in the larger context of the series, to suggest a preference for masculine terms over feminine ones, or a desire for gender neutral terms. "Master" does not imply any greater level of respect or authority than "Mistress" does (or "Lady" or "Madame" for that matter); it's just a matter of sex agreement.
 
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ChibiBoi

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Did you mean to quote Sabrblade's comment Frenchfries?

Anyway, if the Animamates referred to Galaxia as their master, it would be whatever, but technically they should still use "mistress" because Galaxia is a woman. There's nothing about Galaxia's character, and certainly nothing in the larger context of the series, to suggest a preference for masculine terms over feminine ones, or a desire for gender neutral terms. "Master" does not imply any greater level of respect or authority than "Mistress" does (or "Lady" or "Madame" for that matter); it's just a matter of sex agreement.
I mean I don’t know what to tell you guys other than the fact that the term “mistress” has fallen out of favor as a title for women who are in a superior position of power. Mistress is mostly used now as a term for a female lover, a dominatrix (“My name is Dita, I’ll be your mistress tonight”), or to portray sex appeal a la Elvira Mistress of the Dark.

Not to mention, Galaxia is a warrior, she wears a full body of armor and is a leader and victor in the Sailor Wars. She speaks with a low, commanding voice. It makes sense for her lackies to refer to her as “master”

Oh, and a few more examples I found. You can find a bunch of these just by Googling “Master [insert feminine name]” in quotes.



 
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Sep 13, 2009
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No its being used as her appellation not as her role.

Literally every example you’ve given has been in the context of a non-personable description of authority.

It would be correct if the Animates referred to Galaxia as their master. It’s not correct to refer to her as Master Galaxia.
Uh, I've given no such examples. You've quoted the wrong person.
 
Likes: ChibiBoi
Sep 13, 2009
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Man, imagine how angry everyone who already bought all of the first releases are gonna feel if the better versions get released by Viz so soon.